Tuesday, 27 October 2009

The educational divide

Catching up with news after a long period of unexpected leave. The first thing I came across was a story about the educational divide: "Britain is becoming increasingly divided along educational lines with degree blackspots springing up in the poorest areas of the country as graduates flock to the capital" according to the Guardian reporting on research from the lecturer's union UCU.

The analysis involves looking at the proportion of working age population with degrees in every parliamentary constituency. What it tells us is that graduates choose to live in some areas (Richmond Park 63% graduates) and not others (Hodge Hill, Birmingham 9.9%). Whatever the newspapers say, it doesn't tell us anything about widening participation (that is about flows into education, not location decisions afterwards) and on whether this pattern is a good or bad thing for people who do not graduate.

1 comment:

Tim said...

I imagine kids growing up in areas in which a univ education is normal are more likely to think it normal, and therefore aspire to it. Role models matter.

And it will certainly affect the areas that firms will want to move to, insofar as HK matters (it does) and that parly constituencies are labour markets (that rather depends on the place)